Building  A Working Tribe

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Building a working tribe of equals



1. Due to the fact that everything is supposition at this point and doom has been predicted and prophecies since the beginning of time we have to operate on two fronts, everyday life and the what if tomorrow never comes scenario.

2. The Plan makes a solid plan that includes stress management.

3. A tribe must be made of several specialized people

A. Workers - young people who are strong and able

B. Hunters – also young and know how to hunt trap and stalk

C. Tool makers and fixers – people with mechanical and scientific knowledge that will design produce and fix items necessary to you survival

D. Medical – someone trained in the basics of first aid not weak of heart, with understanding of natural medicines also empathetic and part personal councilor to help with the depression and anxiety that will go along with a complete reset of life

E. Cook – anyone can burn food but meals are important to the tribes social structure and a personals metal health it is the most important part of survival

F. Someone that can sew and fix clothing

G. HIGHLY IMPORTANT – someone who knows the ways in preserving food so you don’t all die from food poisoning

4. Creating of the council – the tribe must meet every day to deal with problems on a all level pass the conch meeting, intertribal squabbles can end the survival possibility of all in the tribe.

5. The constitution – and written list of rules that must be unanimously be approved by all in the tribe

6. Selection of leaders preferable one of each sex so all feel represented to weigh and asses the important decisions.

7. Before letting someone be voted into your tribe prepare some questions to ask a person before the vote. For example: have you been on welfare all your life – these people are likely to be lazy and a drain on your tribe. Each tribe must decide what is acceptable.

8. And tribal economy – sounds stupid but each person will bring different skills and provisions. And each skill has a value. Like someone who is making and fixing tools and cloths or treating your wounds does not have the time or skill to hunt or grow food, does that mean they should not eat?

9. PRE EVENT RESEARCHERS – everyone must break up the duty of finding information on surviving without electricity or a buyable food source print these things out and build books in loose leaf folders each person should have a category so everyone isn’t duplicating the efforts of another

10. PRE EVENT supplies each person in your tribe may have different current incomes, what each has in the way of supplies and need of supplies must listed so things that are needed as a group can be bought or made as a group while it is still possible. We all know we need food provisions and fuel sources. But so many forget there are many other things we might need in an electric and transportation free world for example: ropes tarps guns ammo arrows bows, traps snares wax thread needles medical supplies bandages toilet paper feminine supplies antibiotic like Fishmox bleach alcohol still supplies peroxide soap towels list can go on forever. And of course a dry cool critter free place to stockpile this stuff.

TO BE CONTINUED
 



Pre Event Education

Which plants in your area are edible and which ones aren’t

How to make a charcoal based water filtration system to clean drinking water and how to purify it through chemical, boiling and ozonation techniques

How to make a wood gassifier to power mechanical engines without gasoline

How to build a small electric radio wave receiver and transmitter

What’s needed and how to weld metal

How to convert AC and DC electricity to cross power needed electrical items

What individual daily water intake requirements are and how to dig a well to access ground water

How to cook meats with nothing but the sun

How to build fires even in snow without matches or fuels

How to build a hand powered electrical generator for use in flashlights, radios, etc.

How to snare small animals out in the wild

What bugs and other nasty critters you can eat to stay alive

How to make a make shift compass to navigate with and how to navigate accurately without one

How to germinate seeds for planting

How to make homemade solar panels

How to make your own fishing hooks and traps with everyday items

How to communicate with Morse Code





COPING

Be prepared to deal with the things below

STAGE 1 - Coping



Assuming that  a major cataclysmic event that will alter human life forever
various disaster scenarios, along with their probabilities of actually happening and the dangers to human life they represent – from shifting magnetic poles, to brown dwarf flybys to rogue asteroid attacks to increased solar storms and cosmic rays , failure of the national or world economy, break down of social infrastructure, and the list goes on.
What the end of electricity and 1st world food distribution operations will have on life as we know it
How to prepare for mass public hysteria and marshal law - people will go insane and all semblance on civilized behavior will be a thing of the past
What variables like sea level, frost depth, volcanic ash spread, ground faults, rainfall amounts and depth to ground water and others prioritize what locations in North America provide the highest probable likelihood of survival given each disaster scenario and what locations you simply cannot afford to be in under any circumstance
How to effectively plan an escape plan from major metropolitan centers and getting to caches of stored supplies and resources to make it to a high probability survival locations
How to preserve what supplies and food stores you’re able to muster to elongate your survival timetable
What the timeframes of different disaster scenarios will look like to aid in planning
What survival skills you will need to survive without electricity, running water, oils and fuels, medicines and access to commercially available foods
How and where to plan and build a long-term survival plan including the skills you will need to access ground water, purifying water supplies, growing your own food, and how to develop building materials from raw materials
What suppliers offer great preparedness products from dried and bulk food items, to storage kits and shelter in place options
And all the raw survival skills you’ll need to deal with any situation!
STAGE 2 -Planning for a real future

Assuming you make it to a survivable location and you have the skills to survive the first few months without electricity, running water and the other realities of life in a post apocalyptic world; you’ll need to quickly need to turn your attention to long-term survival.
LEARN NOW how to set up sustainable farming, accessing geothermal heat sources and other techniques that will be critical to long-term survival once the initial dangers past

HISTORICAL NOTE:

Due to the genome project, it has been determined that every person on earth can be traced to an original matriarchal, or mitochondrial beginning gene pool of 292 women in a small pocket on the western coast of Africa. So going out on a limb lets say that mankind had reached a technological point equal or greater then our own, ( and there is much evidence of this ) and there was a similar great disaster! that means that of all the people on the planet at that time only these few survived to continue the human race, that is pretty scary odds. archeological anomalies have been dug up that make no sense so get buried in museums as they have no way to classify these objects. but regardless everything you see around you except things made of rock will basically rot, rust, dissolve, and find them selves under miles of stone and dirt, over a geologically quick period of time as little as 200 years to 2500 years depending on the nature and make up of the object, only stone, and gold, maybe a few exotic alloys survives over millennia and even that dissolves and changes given enough time.



THE HARD COLD FACTS

In disasters many people die , people you love will die. and it will effect your mental health and this is one of the greatest benefits of a tribe is the support of others thru personally hurtful times.

There may even come a time, when you have to help someone pass, who is injured or sick beyond repair, and letting them continue in great misery. Only the mentally strong will survive, so you must make sure you know who the people in your tribe are, I personally test everyone I know and find there breaking and trigger points, how much it takes to make them mad, sulk, violent, cry, it is the only way to know who you are dealing with, it has made me hated by many people over the years but it has also gotten the weak minded from my orbit. I will not find myself in a situation that I get dragged under by the person who freaks or panics to the point the endanger my tribe or myself. - thanks for reading  - NnitehawkK
 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE ONLY

how you use or don't use it is up to the reader and I take no responsibility for the out come of its sue

Personal food kits for on the cheap preparedness – this does not include water sources

In each ration box or tote – 1 week – for 4 people 2 adults 2 children

Three normal size bags dried beans

4 1 lb boxes of pasta

2 boxes Mac-n cheese

Assorted spices whatever you want

Can of vegetable shortening

Three bags of rice

On bottle of generic over the counter multivitamins

7 cans of condensed milk

1 100 count box of tea

jar peanut butter

box of saltines

2 zip lock sandwich bags of coffee

4 large cans of tomato sauce

12 packs of Kool-Aid mix

On 1 box of powdered milk

1 gallon zip locks of flour

1 gallon zip lock bag of sugar

1 gallon zip lock bag of cornmeal

This goes in ball jars --- salted pork – how to make salt pork

Cut pork into cubes cook in oven at 250 for about 3 hours

In each ball jar put 1/8 cup of salt --- add pork to ¾full while still warm pour boiling water on top and a table spoon of shortening this will make an O2 seal when it cools – make sure all jars are bleached in hot water and well as the seals before doing this – now when you sued this it has to be soaked in clean warm water to de salt it water will need to be changed 2 or three times or it will be un edible

Rotate these totes every 12 months – just use the contents as normal it is a rather bland gassy diet but will cover the dietary needs

For peeps in the country

Get a book on your local area and figure out what grows wild that you can eat

Buy a bow and arrows learn to use them

By a regular shot gun and 200 ro0unds of deer slugs

8 rolls toilet paper

12 chocolate bars

CAN OPENER

plastic utensils and plates don't waste water for washing dishes if it can be avoided

each person should have a minimum of 4 liters of water per day

keep water purification tables in first aid kit

 

FIRST AID KIT

Bandages

Iodine

Bleach

Medical tape

Gauze

Aspirin

Tea bags – put wet tea bags on puncture wounds

Razor blades

Hacksaw – I won’t say what this is for but if the time comes you will know

Gun powder – to cauterize bad wounds

Sewing needles and monofilament thread or 100% cotton thread

You can make stitching needles by heating them till they glow and bending into a half moon have several sizes

Alcohol

Peroxide

Eye drops and eye wash

Cayenne pepper

Salt

Fishmox – fish mox is amoxicillin can be gotten of Amazon – you must know if you are allergic

I am not suggesting you consume it use you own judgment - do some research on Google search "Fishmox human consumption"

never use or store tetracycline it becomes toxic and deadly in a very short period of time

 

FEEL FREE TO ADD TO THIS as it is just a basic outline

 

IS IT TIME TO RUN??????????????

I have even added Amazon links for most of the needed supplies

 

Imagine the following scenario. You are awakened in the middle of the night by the jolt of a powerful earthquake. Your house is leveled, but thankfully you and your family are uninjured. However, the roads are impassable, your utilities have been cut off, and many of your neighbors were injured or killed in the earthquake. The only thing you have to survive is what you have on hand, and because you are a Frugal Dad reader, your bug out bag.

floodvictims021010

Unfortunately, this was a very real scenario for the people of Haiti. And in years past we’ve seen other examples, from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina to the tsunami in Indonesia. On a smaller scale, we’ve also seen blizzards, floods and other natural disasters leave many people to fend for themselves. With some preparation, and a little planning, you can greatly improve the chances your family can get through these types of survival situations.

What exactly is a bug out bag?

A bug out bag is a collection of basic survival gear that might be required in a disaster scenario, natural or otherwise. It is transportable, and consolidated into a single pack or two so that you can grab it and go in a hurry. I like to keep one at home and one in each vehicle, but how you implement the bug out bag is up to you.

The actual bag could be as simple as an extra frameless backpack or duffel bag, or as elaborate as a framed ALICE pack or similar framed backpack. The best bug out bag is one that you can pack the most in and still carry comfortably in the field.

What About Bugging In?

In some cases, it might make sense to “bug in.” If you have a decent generator,  and a good supply of fuel, you might be safer staying put and living off items stored at your house. Naturally, this assumes your house is still safe and there are few immediate threats around you. If there are, you are better off bugging out with a well-packed bug out bag.

What goes in a bug out bag?

Anticipating worst-case scenarios is never fun, but to properly pack your bug out bag with only the essential items, you must start here. Imagine no food, no electricity, no water, and no city services for days. What types of things would you need to survive?

  1. A couple rations of food (I buy from MountainHouse.com). We have a big bag of rice, and several packs of packaged tuna with a two-years shelf life. Both have a lot of calories and are easy to prepare, but are relatively light to pack.
  2. 3 Gallon Rigid Water Containers. Keep a couple of these on hand and toss them in your trunk before bugging out. At 3 gallons, it is not so heavy that the wife and kids couldn’t lug a couple in an emergency, or if I wasn’t there or was out of commission. These rigid style containers are more durable than gallon water jugs, so they are less likely to leak.
  3. Flashlights. Be sure to pack at least one flashlight per bug out bag. And never burn more than one light at a time to preserve batteries. A hand-crank light can come in handy too, for battery-less operation.
  4. Batteries.  Be sure to have the right size for your equipment, and pack plenty of extras.
  5. Glow sticks. When flashlights fail, or when you don’t need a high concentration of direct light, glow sticks are a wise choice.
  6. Hand-crank emergency radio. Staying informed is a key to survival. A hand-cranked radio requires no batteries or electricity, and can provide news bulletins, weather updates, and information on evacuation routes, etc.
  7. Multi-tool. I wouldn’t want to be anywhere without a multi-tool!
  8. Knives. At a minimum, I’d recommend a folding camp knife with a saw edge, a Swiss Army knife with attachments, and a large, fixed-blade survival knife.
  9. Rope/cord. Some 550 paracord is a must-have in your survival kit for tying up food, making a shelter, and plenty of other uses.
  10. Change of clothes. This is not vital, as you can always wash/dry clothing in the field. If you have room, take along an extra set and lean towards cold weather gear.
  11. Water purification tablets/drops. Boiling water is the most effective way to reduce the risk of ingesting a parasite. However, purification tablets are a close second when boiling isn’t practical. Of course, at home I’d just use my Berkey Light water filter.
  12. Anti-diarrhea medication. Be sure to have this one hand in the event you or a family member does suffer from diarrhea, which can lead to life-threatening dehydration very quickly in a survival situation.
  13. Stainless steel Kanteen. I like this stainless steel Kanteen for carrying water (no worries over BPA’s in plastic), and it can be heated by hanging above a flame through cord threaded through the screw-on cap.
  14. Bottle of multi-vitamins. While on a survival diet, chances are you will be lacking the required nutrients from food alone. A good multi-vitamin will help keep your immune system up.
  15. Emergency blankets. These Mylar blankets help hold in heat in an emergency. In addition to those in our bug out bag, we also have a couple in the glove compartment of our car, just in case.
  16. Bug repellent. After water disasters (floods, tsunamis, hurricanes, etc.) there will likely be standing water nearby, which is great breeding ground for mosquitoes. Mosquitoes, and other insects, are known for helping transmit diseases in these conditions, so keep your skin protected at all times.
  17. Compass. Nothing fancy needed here. Just look for a compass that can reliably provide a north heading.
  18. Map of your surrounding area. Who needs a GPS? When it hits the fan, I’d rather have a map of my city and state than something that requires power and communication with a satellite.
  19. Fire-starting materials. We have a butane torch lighter, water proof matches, a magnesium stick, kindling sticks, cotton balls and petroleum jelly.
  20. Signal mirror. Putting a signal mirror’s reflection on a rescue pilot or boat captain is one of the best ways of attracting attention.
  21. Sun block. If caught out in the open on a hot summer day, you’ll be glad you packed sun block to prevent the sun from cooking your exposed skin.
  22. A safety whistle for each family member. Safety whistles can be used to attract attention from rescuers, and to communicate with family members if separated. Plus, they take a lot less energy and make a lot more noise than screaming.
  23. Fishing lures and line. If you can get to a natural body of water, chances are there is a food source in there. It’s possible to catch fish without lures and line, but having it sure improves your chances!
  24. Ziploc bags. Great for waterproofing items, rationing food, etc.
  25. Hand sanitizer. We personally packed a few bottles of Purell hand sanitizer. If you shop the cheap stuff, just be sure it has a alcohol content between 60% and 95% to maximize germ-killing effectiveness.
  26. Camp axe. Probably the most important tool when setting up a camp. A good camp axe can help clear a camp site, split firewood, and chop down small trees for shelter.
  27. Folding shovel. It isn’t pleasant to think about, but you may have to bury waste, or have the less-gross task of digging a fire pit. Either way, a folding shovel will do the job.
  28. First aid kit. I prefer the soft-sided kits here because they are more compact and flexible than the large, plastic box first aid kits.
  29. Survival handbook. A good survival handbook should cover information such as how to make shelters, identify plants and animals to eat, and strategies to get rescued.
  30. Roll of duct tape. Duct tape is the do-it-yourselfer’s best friend, at home and in an emergency situation.
  31. Cash and coins. We keep a couple hundred dollars in cash in a waterproof tube (originally purposed to hold waterproof matches). Also consider taking along a roll of quarters for any coin-operated vending, or to make change.
  32. Ponchos. When you have to leave shelter in search of food, or to move away from danger, keeping yourself dry greatly reduces the chances of getting sick from exposure to a cold rain.
  33. Tarp. With a section of tarp and a little rope tied between two trees you can provide instant shelter in a survival situation.
  34. Deck of cards (to fight boredom). Don’t discount the psychological aspects of survival. After a day or two, boredom will set in and you’ll be glad to have a deck of cards to pass the time.

I recommend picking up one or two items from this list each shopping trip, or ordering them online with a little money from your next few paychecks. It would cost a lot of money to purchase and pack these items all at once. And if you are like me, you’ll have a main bug out bag you keep at home, but a mobile version for the trunk of your car. After all, you never know where you might be in a survival situation.

 IS IT TIME TO RUN?????????????? I have even added Amazon links for most of the needed supplies Imagine the following scenario. You are awakened in the middle of the night by the jolt of a powerful earthquake. Your house is leveled, but thankfully you and your family are uninjured. However, the roads are impassable, your utilities have been cut off, and many of your neighbors were injured or killed in the earthquake. The only thing you have to survive is what you have on hand, and because you are a Frugal Dad reader, your bug out bag. Unfortunately, this was a very real scenario for the people of Haiti. And in years past we’ve seen other examples, from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina to the tsunami in Indonesia. On a smaller scale, we’ve also seen blizzards, floods and other natural disasters leave many people to fend for themselves. With some preparation, and a little planning, you can greatly improve the chances your family can get through these types of survival situations. What exactly is a bug out bag? A bug out bag is a collection of basic survival gear that might be required in a disaster scenario, natural or otherwise. It is transportable, and consolidated into a single pack or two so that you can grab it and go in a hurry. I like to keep one at home and one in each vehicle, but how you implement the bug out bag is up to you. The actual bag could be as simple as an extra frameless backpack or duffel bag, or as elaborate as a framed ALICE pack or similar framed backpack. The best bug out bag is one that you can pack the most in and still carry comfortably in the field. What About Bugging In? In some cases, it might make sense to “bug in.” If you have a decent generator, and a good supply of fuel, you might be safer staying put and living off items stored at your house. Naturally, this assumes your house is still safe and there are few immediate threats around you. If there are, you are better off bugging out with a well-packed bug out bag. What goes in a bug out bag? Anticipating worst-case scenarios is never fun, but to properly pack your bug out bag with only the essential items, you must start here. Imagine no food, no electricity, no water, and no city services for days. What types of things would you need to survive? A couple rations of food (I buy from MountainHouse.com). We have a big bag of rice, and several packs of packaged tuna with a two-years shelf life. Both have a lot of calories and are easy to prepare, but are relatively light to pack. 3 Gallon Rigid Water Containers. Keep a couple of these on hand and toss them in your trunk before bugging out. At 3 gallons, it is not so heavy that the wife and kids couldn’t lug a couple in an emergency, or if I wasn’t there or was out of commission. These rigid style containers are more durable than gallon water jugs, so they are less likely to leak. Flashlights. Be sure to pack at least one flashlight per bug out bag. And never burn more than one light at a time to preserve batteries. A hand-crank light can come in handy too, for battery-less operation. Batteries. Be sure to have the right size for your equipment, and pack plenty of extras. Glow sticks. When flashlights fail, or when you don’t need a high concentration of direct light, glow sticks are a wise choice. Hand-crank emergency radio. Staying informed is a key to survival. A hand-cranked radio requires no batteries or electricity, and can provide news bulletins, weather updates, and information on evacuation routes, etc. Multi-tool. I wouldn’t want to be anywhere without a multi-tool! Knives. At a minimum, I’d recommend a folding camp knife with a saw edge, a Swiss Army knife with attachments, and a large, fixed-blade survival knife. Rope/cord. Some 550 paracord is a must-have in your survival kit for tying up food, making a shelter, and plenty of other uses. Change of clothes. This is not vital, as you can always wash/dry clothing in the field. If you have room, take along an extra set and lean towards cold weather gear. Water purification tablets/drops. Boiling water is the most effective way to reduce the risk of ingesting a parasite. However, purification tablets are a close second when boiling isn’t practical. Of course, at home I’d just use my Berkey Light water filter. Anti-diarrhea medication. Be sure to have this one hand in the event you or a family member does suffer from diarrhea, which can lead to life-threatening dehydration very quickly in a survival situation. Stainless steel Kanteen. I like this stainless steel Kanteen for carrying water (no worries over BPA’s in plastic), and it can be heated by hanging above a flame through cord threaded through the screw-on cap. Bottle of multi-vitamins. While on a survival diet, chances are you will be lacking the required nutrients from food alone. A good multi-vitamin will help keep your immune system up. Emergency blankets. These Mylar blankets help hold in heat in an emergency. In addition to those in our bug out bag, we also have a couple in the glove compartment of our car, just in case. Bug repellent. After water disasters (floods, tsunamis, hurricanes, etc.) there will likely be standing water nearby, which is great breeding ground for mosquitoes. Mosquitoes, and other insects, are known for helping transmit diseases in these conditions, so keep your skin protected at all times. Compass. Nothing fancy needed here. Just look for a compass that can reliably provide a north heading. Map of your surrounding area. Who needs a GPS? When it hits the fan, I’d rather have a map of my city and state than something that requires power and communication with a satellite. Fire-starting materials. We have a butane torch lighter, water proof matches, a magnesium stick, kindling sticks, cotton balls and petroleum jelly. Signal mirror. Putting a signal mirror’s reflection on a rescue pilot or boat captain is one of the best ways of attracting attention. Sun block. If caught out in the open on a hot summer day, you’ll be glad you packed sun block to prevent the sun from cooking your exposed skin. A safety whistle for each family member. Safety whistles can be used to attract attention from rescuers, and to communicate with family members if separated. Plus, they take a lot less energy and make a lot more noise than screaming. Fishing lures and line. If you can get to a natural body of water, chances are there is a food source in there. It’s possible to catch fish without lures and line, but having it sure improves your chances! Ziploc bags. Great for waterproofing items, rationing food, etc. Hand sanitizer. We personally packed a few bottles of Purell hand sanitizer. If you shop the cheap stuff, just be sure it has a alcohol content between 60% and 95% to maximize germ-killing effectiveness. Camp axe. Probably the most important tool when setting up a camp. A good camp axe can help clear a camp site, split firewood, and chop down small trees for shelter. Folding shovel. It isn’t pleasant to think about, but you may have to bury waste, or have the less-gross task of digging a fire pit. Either way, a folding shovel will do the job. First aid kit. I prefer the soft-sided kits here because they are more compact and flexible than the large, plastic box first aid kits. Survival handbook. A good survival handbook should cover information such as how to make shelters, identify plants and animals to eat, and strategies to get rescued. Roll of duct tape. Duct tape is the do-it-yourselfer’s best friend, at home and in an emergency situation. Cash and coins. We keep a couple hundred dollars in cash in a waterproof tube (originally purposed to hold waterproof matches). Also consider taking along a roll of quarters for any coin-operated vending, or to make change. Ponchos. When you have to leave shelter in search of food, or to move away from danger, keeping yourself dry greatly reduces the chances of getting sick from exposure to a cold rain. Tarp. With a section of tarp and a little rope tied between two trees you can provide instant shelter in a survival situation. Deck of cards (to fight boredom). Don’t discount the psychological aspects of survival. After a day or two, boredom will set in and you’ll be glad to have a deck of cards to pass the time. I recommend picking up one or two items from this list each shopping trip, or ordering them online with a little money from your next few paychecks. It would cost a lot of money to purchase and pack these items all at once. And if you are like me, you’ll have a main bug out bag you keep at home, but a mobile version for the trunk of your car. After all, you never know where you might be in a survival situation. \ SUMMERY Food and water (as much as you can practically carry) Portable radio and extra batteries First aid kit and handbook 5-day supply of any medications you take regularly and a copy of your prescriptions Whistle (to alert rescuers to your location) Personal hygiene supplies (including toilet paper) Emergency lighting (e.g. glow sticks, flashlight, headlamp) and extra batteries Large garbage bags and paper towels Change of clothing and a hat Sturdy shoes, in case an evacuation requires walking long distances Dust mask Pen, paper and tape Cash in small denominations Copy of health insurance card and driver license or identification card Photos of family members for reunification purposes List of emergency contact phone numbers In children’s Go-bags, include medical consent forms, a family photo for reunification purposes and a favorite toy, cards or book. Include flares and jumper cables in your vehicle’s Go-bag. Remember to make a Go-bag for your pet! When assembling your Bug-Out-Bag(s) remember that you will be assembling them with survival, recovery, and comfort in mind in that order. Your smallest and easiest to reach bag should be only for survival. If you can grab two bags or more, the successive bags should have items and equipment geared towards getting you back on your feet and then providing some level of comfort. Consider packing smaller ruck sacks inside of your larger Bug-Out-Bags in the case that you are forced to downsize your load. If you have geared your Bug-Out-Bag towards evacuation by vehicle and suddenly find you are forced to flee on foot, it will be handy to have smaller shoulder carried bags available to reassemble a downsized emergency pack. Having a Bug-Out-Bag presupposes that you already have an evacuation plan already in place. You do have an evacuation plan, don’t you? If not, take this opportunity to put one together. Consider what threats might cause the need to evacuate and where you might go if forced to flee. Plan alternate routes to a number of safe destinations. Where you will be retreating to and how long you will be staying will play a large part in deciding what items will need to be packed in your Bug-Out-Bag.

SUMMERY

  • Food and water (as much as you can practically carry)

     

  • Portable radio and extra batteries
  • First aid kit and handbook
  • 5-day supply of any medications you take regularly and a
    copy of your prescriptions

     

  • Whistle (to alert rescuers to your location)
  • Personal hygiene supplies (including toilet paper)
  • Emergency lighting (e.g. glow sticks, flashlight, headlamp)
    and extra batteries

     

  • Large garbage bags and paper towels
  • Change of clothing and a hat
  • Sturdy shoes, in case an evacuation requires walking long
    distances

     

  • Dust mask
  • Pen, paper and tape
  • Cash in small denominations
  • Copy of health insurance card and driver license or
    identification card

     

  • Photos of family members for reunification purposes
  • List of emergency contact phone numbers
  • In children’s Go-bags, include medical consent forms, a
    family photo for reunification purposes and a favorite toy,
    cards or book.
  • Include flares and jumper cables in your vehicle’s Go-bag.
  • Remember to make a Go-bag for your pet!

When assembling your Bug-Out-Bag(s) remember that you will be assembling them with survival, recovery, and comfort in mind in that order. Your smallest and easiest to reach bag should be only for survival. If you can grab two bags or more, the successive bags should have items and equipment geared towards getting you back on your feet and then providing some level of comfort. Consider packing smaller ruck sacks inside of your larger Bug-Out-Bags in the case that you are forced to downsize your load. If you have geared your Bug-Out-Bag towards evacuation by vehicle and suddenly find you are forced to flee on foot, it will be handy to have smaller shoulder carried bags available to reassemble a downsized emergency pack.

Having a Bug-Out-Bag presupposes that you already have an evacuation plan already in place. You do have an evacuation plan, don’t you? If not, take this opportunity to put one together. Consider what threats might cause the need to evacuate and where you might go if forced to flee. Plan alternate routes to a number of safe destinations. Where you will be retreating to and how long you will be staying will play a large part in deciding what items will need to be packed in your Bug-Out-Bag.